Archive for the ‘Womens Hormones’ Category

The best supplements for Hashimoto’s

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Dr. Christensen nailed this article.  So I’m going to insert it exactly as is.  For those of you with the autoimmune condition of Hashimoto’s, here is an excellent summary of the supplements that are needed (and not much more).  (Note: Lifestyle choices are equally as important but are not included here).

“Supplements To Take For Hashimoto’s

 By: Dr. Alan Christianson

 

With the vast array of supplements readily available, it’s easy to get overwhelmed with taking too many each day. When it comes to which supplements to take for Hashimoto’s, I have a simple strategy: Keep it focused and simple.

What do I mean by that?

With Hashimoto’s, you want to make sure you are getting what you need, and you aren’t getting what you don’t need.

Simple, right?

Some supplements will work against your body and set you back. Others aren’t bad, per se, but they aren’t the most important when it comes to treating Hashimoto’s. Remember, your body metabolizes all supplements through the liver, so taking 20-30 a day may have little benefit and be hard on your system.

Which supplements do you want to make sure you are getting?

  1. Vitamin A: You want to get a good blend of carotenoids. Beta carotene is the carotenoid you hear about most. Your body makes beta carotene into active vitamin A. In order to get a good blend of carotenoids, look for whole foods and versions of vitamin A that contain them. I love palm fruit, as it has a nice spectrum of carotenoids and is very bioavailable. This means it’s easy for the body to convert and activate.
  1. Vitamin C: I recommend 500-1,000 milligrams per day and not much more than that. There is a lot of data proving antioxidants are important, but if you have too much of any one, you end up robbing your body’s own antioxidants (like superoxide dismutase or glutathione).
  1. Vitamin D: This vitamin is super-important and available in many forms. I prefer the capsules, as it’s easier to track how much I’m getting. Very few people reach a good blood level of Vitamin D with less than 10,000 units per day. Make sure you’re taking enough, and you’re taking it with food.

When considering vitamin D supplementation, it’s important to realize this vitamin allows your body to absorb calcium. This is a good thing if you’re getting the right type of calcium, and your body is using it properly, yielding stronger bones. It’s a bad thing if it isn’t the right type of calcium or if your body isn’t using it well. This will create plaque in the blood vessels, causing joint calcification, kidney stones or gallstones.
The important types of calcium are those similar to the calcium found in plants. They dissolve easily in water. My favorite form is dicalcium malate. It won’t cause calcification or gum up your arteries. This type is also free of lead. A lot of calcium is derived from oyster shells or bones (like the microcrystalline hydroxyapatite). There is concern about lead contamination with these types. (Because bone tissue always contain lead, there is also concern regarding bone broths, collagen and gelatin.)
It is good to take a plant-based magnesium, as well. When it comes to calcium-magnesium ratios, many of the high-dosage guidelines were based on types not easily absorbed. I’m a fan of a couple hundred milligrams (or even slightly less) per day and in close-to-equal ratios. When you’re taking forms that are well-absorbed and free of lead, you don’t need much.

  1. B-Vitamins: The B-vitamins are all critically important. Let’s look at them individually.

Folic Acid: Avoid all synthetic folic acid. This is important for one reason: Those with thyroid disease have a gene defect that causes folic acid to be poison, raising the risk for colorectal cancer. Instead, look for methylfolate as your folate source. You need a milligram per day, which is 1,000 micrograms. This helps your body with its methylation pathways.

B12: The preferred form of B12 is methyl B12, which is well-absorbed orally.

Biotin: Biotin is critical for your hair, skin and nail health. You want to take 3,000 micrograms (and not more than 3,500 micrograms) per day. If you take much more than this, it actually blocks the body’s usage of it. Many people take mega doses, thinking it will help their hair, and it doesn’t.

B6: Both pyridoxine hydrochloride and pyridoxal 5-phosphate are good forms of B6.

Thiamine: There is current data, showing thiamine is beneficial for both the antibodies of Hashimoto’s and hormone conversion.

B5 (Pantothenic Acid or Pantothenate): This B-vitamin benefits your cortisol levels and cortisol conversion. It’s good to have a few milligrams per day

  1. Vitamin K: The best form of vitamin K is vitamin K2. The most research has been done on a form called MK-7. It’s like the vitamin K we make in our intestinal tract. Vitamin K2 allows your body to direct calcium to the bones and away from the blood vessels. It also plays an important role in your blood’s ability to clot properly.
  1. Trace Minerals: Trace minerals and ultra trace minerals are extremely important. When it comes to thyroid disease, selenium is the big hitter. Selenium is difficult to absorb and is still being debated as to how well it enters the bloodstream in supplemental form. The most data is available regarding selenium glycinate complexes (selenium bound with a carrier protein, called glycine). This form is easily absorbed, non-toxic and effective.

Also, consider a few of the more exotic trace minerals: vanadium, molybdenum, boron and manganese. These are all critical for building and utilizing thyroid hormones.

  1. Bioflavonoids: There are two important bioflavonoids I recommend: hersperetin and quercetin. These do well in strengthening your connective tissues. Varicose veins, hemorrhoids or easy bruising are all related to the strength of connective tissue. So, take a few milligrams of these two bioflavonoids on a regular basis to help round out your supplementation.
  1. Essential Fats: EPA and DHA are the critical essential fats to control inflammation, keep the brain functioning well and help repair joints and cartilage.”

Be well,

Lynn

Nutritional Deficiencies Self-Assessment

Nutritional Deficiencies

Welcome to the Nutritional Deficiencies assessment.  This assessment does not determine if a deficiency definitely exists but does provide guidance and information to share with your practitioner.  Nutritional Deficiencies are necessary in identifying needs of an individual experiencing any type of health problem.

Please complete the assessment to the best that you can. If you experience 3 or more of a symptom you may be experiencing a deficiency.  If you experience 5 or more of a symptom related to the vitamin/hormone/fatty acid, please consult with your practitioner.  

The results will be sent to me.  You will receive a copy as well.

I’m trained as a functional diagnostic nutrition practitioner and will assist you with immune, digestive, detoxification, environmental stressors and neurotransmitters so be sure to add additional information that you think will be helpful.

You can reach me at the Contact Us page if you have any further questions.

Be well,

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40 Healthy Gluten Free Lunch Ideas

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The Paleo Mom put together 40 healthy gluten free lunch ideas that trumps any other site I’ve seen.  It’s filled with pictures completing each meal with protein, fats and carbohydrates and VARIETY (something I severely lack in).  
Last year I implemented encouragement for my kids to make their own lunches the night before (thanks to my friend Annie).  I can see that they are lacking variety as well in building their lunches even though their enthusiasm remains.  I’m so looking forward to sharing these pictures with them.  Here’s a sample of one lunch with 39 to go.  Be sure to visit the site here.

 

Be well,

Lynn

 

Remember ladies, it’s common but it’s certainly NOT normal.

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Poop transplant curing autism, MS, CFS and more?

Yep, you read that correctly.  Fecal microbiota transplant “FMT” (easily referred to as “poop” transplant) has been in the forefront of modern medicine for the past few years, despite its discovery in 1958.  The discussion of the microbiome, the imbalances, its affect on  the brain and its impact in neurological disorders is ever pressing.  I’ve been following it for quite some time, but this true story below just recently caught my attention.

Recently a 10 year old boy with autistic behaviors and gastrointestinal issues underwent 5 FMT’s and has fully recovered.  Read the article here written by Dr. Perlmutter a functional neurologist: http://www.drperlmutter.com/brain-maker/

He’s one of many individuals that are recovering from C.Diff infections, Crohn’s disease, Colitis, CFS and many other chronic illnesses.   Read more successes here 

Currently there are 150 medical facilities across the nation that are conducting poop transplants but the FDA has yet to approve it.  Currently a facility in Arizona is conducting an 18 week treatment study to be reviewed by the FDA.  

Want more information?  Per the Power of Poop website:

Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT) is also known as a stool transplant, bacteriotherapy and human probiotic infusion.   It is a natural, medication free way to repopulate the intestinal microbiome.  FMT involves transferring fecal bacteria  from a healthy donor to repopulate the unbalanced gut bacteria of a sick person. It is used to treat  Clostridium Difficile  (C. Diff.)  infection and increasingly other conditions such as Ulcerative Colitis, Crohns Disease and digestive illness of indeterminate cause. There is also anecdotal evidence from Professor Thomas Borody’s Centre for Digestive Diseases to suggest that FMT could benefit other conditions including autoimmune disorders, neurological conditions, obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes and Parkinson’s disease.  The first reported FMT was in 1958 and involved the successful treatment of four patients with pseudomembranous colitis before C. Diff. was the known cause.

FMT involves a series of infusions of stool blended with saline or distilled water. Frozen stool can also be used but takes longer to populate. Medical transfer of stool is undertaken via enema, colonoscope or nasogastric tube. Home infusion usually takes place via enema, syringe or capsule. Various parties are researching the commercial production of freeze-dried stool capsules and artificial intestinal flora.

All medical interventions come with risk. However in over 370 published reports there has been no reported infection transmitted by FMT so the risks are minimal.   A study published in the New England Medical Journal in January 2013 reported a 94% cure rate of pseudomembranous colitis caused by C Diff from FMT compared to a mere 31% with vancomycin. The study was stopped prematurely as it was considered unethical not to offer the FMT to all participants.

– See more at: http://thepowerofpoop.com/about/about-fecal-transplant/#sthash.PgbayyGG.dpuf “

This is exciting research.  I’m looking forward to more findings.

Be well,

Lynn

Having GABA issues? There’s a link that you should know about…

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GABA is made in all neurons of the brain, is recycled through our energy systems (mitochondria) and aside from seretonin, is one of the major calming mechanisms built in the body. GABA is integrated into many of the anti epileptic drugs on the market and understood to play a factor into seizure disorders.

Glutamate, an amino acid, is recyled through the mitochondria using an enzyme (referred to as GAD, glutamate decarboxylase) and converted to GABA.  If the GAD enzyme is compromised or shunted, GABA is not produced which means, no calm.  Instead glutamate perpetuates and anxiety continues to climb.  This is not a good situation.  

Gluten intolerance and celiac disease create an autoimmune response that can attack the GAD enzyme mentioned above.  Again if the GAD enzyme is compromised or shunted, GABA cannot be made and anxiety builds.  There is no calm.  

Anxiety disorders are at an all time high.  Could a root cause be a gluten intolerance? Absolutely.  Depending on the time that the exposure has occurred can impact whether removing gluten is enough. Regardless, if you experience anxiety, entirely remove gluten.   As Dr. Tom O’Bryan states…’if you are a gluten intolerant you cannot consume even a little amount of gluten just like you can’t be a little bit pregnant’. 

Be well,

Lynn

Are you low in this hormone that promotes peace and relaxation?

Progesterone is our hormone that’s made in the adrenals and in women, in the ovaries.  It helps us feel energetic, sleep well through the night, support our stress response, keeps our memory strong, skin elastic and promotes GABA, a built-in calming mechanism.  

Unfortunately through perimenopause and menopause, it leaves women quickly.  

How do you know if you are low in progesterone?

  • Do you wake between 2 and 4 am?
  • Do you experience heavy bleeding?
  • Erratic periods?
  • Anxiety? 
  • Low libido?
  • Fibrocystic breasts?

Even though many of these symptoms above are “common” they are NOT “normal”.  

There are certain supplements you can take to support the levels of progesterone, such as Vitamin C and selenium. Exercising “relaxation” and  identifying what other stressors can be reducing your progesterone levels can also support you.  And if attempting these supports on your own aren’t working, further testing may be warranted.  

Remember: you are entitled to feel great, not just “normal”.  

Be well,

Lynn

Digestion has to do with allergies?

Food allergies (or sensitivities) occur because of three factors: nutritional, immune and inflammatory. Eating foods serves multiple purposes: to provide both macro and micronutrients for the functions of systems; support optimal function of the brain; provide fuel for the performance of the body and so on.  The processes that are involved to meet these purposes involves digestion and detoxification.   When exploring the three factors that contribute to allergies, digestion must be supported.

The digestive process begins in the mouth when food is chewed and mixed with saliva.  It’s then swallowed and travels into the stomach where acid then helps to break down the food particles.  These particles travels through the intestinal tract where digestive enzymes are activated and further breakdown the food particles.   At any one of these stages, there may be breakdowns that don’t allow the entire breakdown and absorption of nutrients.  Low stomach acid and low digestive enzymes can result in larger food particles.

When food is not completely broken down it creates partial proteins and other molecules that the immune system identifies as foreign invaders.  The immune system follows by attacking these proteins and molecules.  The end result is an allergic response.  An allergic response creates a chronic inflammatory response.  In general, inefficiencies within the digestive system can result in an allergic and inflammatory response and nutritional deficiencies.

Why the depletion of stomach acid and digestive enzymes, especially in children?  Medications, heavy metals, dysbiosis in the GI tract (can result from C-Section deliveries), refined foods, sugars, food allergies (not detected early), to name a few.

What to do?

Support the digestive system first, before adding other supplements.  Probiotics, essential fatty acids (low levels are correlated with allergies), stomach acid (if H.Pyroluria has been ruled out), digestive enzymes and a clean sugar free diet is necessary to improve the health of digestive system, reduce inflammation and reduce, if not stop, the allergic response.

Be well,

Lynn

Top neurologist discusses gut/brain connection and the cause of major neurological diseases.

It’s a must watch.

 

 

 

 

Be well,

Lynn

How to identify nutritional deficiencies…

Nutritional deficiencies are one of 9 areas of chronic inflammation (you can read more about them here) that I address with my clients.  It’s a difficult area to address specific nutrient deficiencies for a few reasons.  Identifying specific nutritional deficiencies can be become quite costly especially when ordering blood tests for each vitamin or mineral. Assessing by dosing and toleration is another approach, but one deficiency alone may not address a complex need for multiple nutritional supports.

I do offer self-assessments that are to completed by each client, on an as needed basis. These are helpful in targeting specific nutrients.  I’ve also used the Organic Acids Test to help identify not only nutritional deficiencies with B Vitamins but also assess bacterial and fungal infections, and depleted markers in detoxification, mitochondrial and neurotransmitters.  

But just recently I was introduced to a lab test that can detect a multitude of deficiencies.   The lab Spectracell offers a detailed assessment of an individuals highly targeted micronutrient deficiencies.  In F.D.N. my generalized approach is exploring H.I.D.D.E.N. stressors (hormone, immune, digestion, detoxification, environment and neurotransmitters).  All of the micronutrients listed below can lead to a malfunction of any or more of these systems. If you are suffering from any illness including: autoimmune disease, neurological disorders, fatigue, headaches, sleep disorders, digestive problems (to name a few) Spectracell is warranted.    Spectracell offers this test through a qualified practitioner (that’s me :)) . It’s at a great price too:$390 cash or $190 with proof of insurance.  

If you are interested in understanding nutritional deficiencies this may be a great addition to any healing protocol that you are working with.  

VITAMINS
Vitamin A
Vitamin B1
Vitamin B2
Vitamin B3
Vitamin B6
Vitamin B12
Biotin
Folate
Pantothenate
Vitamin C
Vitamin D
Vitamin K
MINERALS
Calcium
Magnesium
Manganese
Zinc
CopperAMINO ACIDS
Asparagine
Glutamine
Serine
ANTIOXIDANT
Alpha Lipoic Acid
Coenzyme Q10
Cysteine
Glutathione
Selenium
Vitamin ESPECTROX
for Total
Antioxidant Function

IMMUNIDEX
Immune Response Score

CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM
Chromium
Fructose Sensitivity
Glucose-Insulin MetabolismFATTY ACIDS
Oleic Acid

METABOLITES
Choline
Inositol
Car

Be well,

Lynn