Posts Tagged ‘dr.’

“Why diseases don’t exist and what really makes you sick”

The title is quoted from Dr. Hyman’s recent blog. Dr. Hyman is a functional medicine doctor and mainstream well-recognized guru in the field of functional medicine. I encourage you to read this particular blog from top to bottom if:

  • You are 1 in 2 (yikes!) Americans that experience a chronic illness 
  • You have been give a name (chronic fatigue syndrome) for your illness, then it’s blamed (it’s because you have chronic fatigue syndrome) for your illness and then it was attempted to be tamed (here’s a medication).  
  • You don’t have results and are stuck in sickness.

My apologies if this comes across too harsh but the information is necessary.

Please read the blog here 

Always in your interest to be well,

Lynn

For Our Men: Important!!!

07-DEC-health-digest-ear-sl

Heart disease is the number one cause of death in both men and women. Women receive a warning system as they age if there are imbalances, infections and/or inflammation. It’s called perimenopause and menopause. Symptoms vary from women to women and unlike common beliefs, hot flashes, inability to sleep, weight gain are not normal, but rather warning signs. Men, however, don’t receive a warning system per say. Or do they? I just recently listened to an excellent podcast by Dr. Joel Kahn, a holistic cardiologist. What he had to say is extremely important. I urge you to read this thoroughly and to share this with your loved ones.

Don’t wait for chest pain or a mild heart attack to seek help. There are other early warning symptoms that must be explored:

  • Erectile dysfunction is an indication of vascular issues and can be a predictor of heart disease. There’s a strong correlation between erectile dysfunction preceding heart disease.
  • Baldness can indicate clogged arteries.
  • Calf cramps may indicate that blood is not flowing below the heart.
  • A vertical ear crease has been correlated with heart disease.
  • Poor sleep habits (less than 7 hours per sleep per night) increases risk.
  • A poor diet.

If you feel that you or your loved one is showing these risk factors, then please read further.

What tests have been traditionally conducted? An EKG/ECG, which is commonly recommended, recognizes only electrical activity of the heart and identifies latent stages of advanced heart disease. Alllow me to emphasize, an EKG doesn’t recognize early stages and is not enough. An exercise stress test: looks for lesions… but if 40 to 60% of the lesions are narrowed, it will be missed. In other words a stress test picks up the worst of the worst. Cardio lite is nuclear ingested and involves loads of radiation providing great inaccuracies…false positives and missed populations.

It’s important to look at the actual arteries to find out if they are blocked.

There are two extremely important tests that offer early detection of heart disease. The first is a coronary artery scan. This will show if 99% or more of arteries are damaged. There are three main arteries that pump blood in and out of the heart. The heart arteries are deep and small. Calcification (bone like material in arteries also referred to as plaque) contains 20% of calcium and show up easy in XRays. The test involves a cat heart scan (quick and informative) and is available in every clinic across the country. Nothing is injected into the blood stream and the radiation exposure is 1 SMV compared to the cardiolite which is 12-15SMV’s. The ideal result is “0” based on a formula. A result of 1-99 increases the risk of heart disease by 50% more than patients with 0. This test is not necessary to repeat more than every 10 years. The Coronary artery calcium screen costs about $100 to $150 per test but is unfortunately not covered by insurance.

The second is a CMIT test ultrasound of the carotid arteries in the neck under the skin. CMIT stands for Carotid Intima-Media thickness. This neck ultrasound checks the thickness of the artery…compared to age. This is the earliest way to know the age of your arteries (are they older or younger than your chronological age). Based on these results a program can begin and this ultrasound can be repeated 6 to 12 months to monitor. The results will show: less than 25th percentile suggests a low risk, 50 -75th percentile offers average thickness and over 75th percentile in thickness of the arteries suggests the highest risk. A middle aged person is .6 to .7 micrometers. For ever .1mm increase in the CMIT results, the risk for heart disease increases by 10 to 15% and the risk of stroke increases by 13 to 18%. The cost again is not covered by insurance but ranges from $150 to $250. Unfortunately it is not as widely available.
Other necessary tests that are recommended by Dr. Kahn and are widely available are:
1. Advanced Cholesterol panel
2. High Sensitivity C Reactive Protein

Let’s continue to be proactive in health.

“The best time to fix the roof is when the sun is shining”. 

Be well,

Lynn

Top neurologist discusses gut/brain connection and the cause of major neurological diseases.

It’s a must watch.

 

 

 

 

Be well,

Lynn

Fat is in. Sugar is out.

According to Dr. Perlmutter, a NY Times bestseller and world respected neurologist, ‘fat is the preferred fuel of humans and has been for all of human evolution.’ We can survive on minimal carbohydrates but would die without fats. When we deprive our bodies with good fats, including cholesterol particles, we deprive our organ that is made up of 30% fat, the brain. The Mayo Clinic conducted a study in 2012 that revealed that older people that consumed a majority of their calories from carbohydrates (Refined flours, sugars, pastas, breads) have nearly four times the risk of developing mild dementia, a precursor to Alzheimer’s. Memory, thinking, language and overall cognitive impairments were the behaviors monitored. Diets rich in healthy fats were found to be 42 percent less likely to experience cognitive impairment (Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease).   The National Institute of Health found similar findings. “Higher levels of cholesterol is associated with better memory function”. Published in the journal Neurology, a study revealed that high cholesterol is a protective factor in the development of ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also referred to as Lou Gehrig’s disease). In the Journal of Movement Disorders 2008 research revealed that people with the lowest LDL cholesterol were at a 350 percent increased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease.

What about research for the heart? The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published a study in 2008 that looked closely at 21 previous medical reports that involved monitoring health in 340,000 subjects over 3 to 5 years. It concluded that “intake of saturated fat was not associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, or cardiovascular disease”. It also compared those subjects that consumed a diet of saturated fats to those that did not. Those  subjects that did consume a diet in saturated fat had a 19% lower risk of heart disease than those that did not. The authors concluded that the original findings of these studies were mildly suppressed by the initiatives of special interest groups (i.e. Big Pharma) to publish only articles that showed fat caused heart disease. (Keep in mind that 75% of research is conducted by these special interest groups).

The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition which consists of leading researchers from around the world has recently stated “At present there is no clear relation of saturated fatty acid intake to these outcomes (of obesity, cardiovascular disease, incidence of cancer and osteoporosis)”. The researchers concluded with “biological interactions between insulin resistance (high refined carbohydrate/sugar consumption), reflected by obesity and physical inactivity and carbohydrate quality and quantity”.

Yet mainstream medicine continues to perpetuate that LDL is so-called “bad cholesterol”. So what is LDL? Cholesterol is so important for optimizing the functions of the body. For this reason the body highly regulates cholesterol. Only 25% of cholesterol is made from foods.  This is why cholesterol readings can vary from certain times in the day!  If you don’t eat enough fats the body will make more cholesterol but most food doesn’t have cholesterol that can be absorbed. The remaining 75% is internally produced in the liver (another reason to support the liver).  Cholesterol is fat soluble and blood is liquid so it must be carried through the body by lipo proteins. Lipo proteins are identified as low-density lipo proteins (LDL), high-density lipo proteins (HDL).

Chris Kresser, a licensed integrative medicine practitioner, describes LDL using a helpful analogy. The blood stream is like a river. The LDL particles are the boats that carry cholesterol and fats around the body. The cholesterol and fats are the cargo in the boats. Today mainstream medicine is looking at the amount cargo in the boats, or rather the LDL. What we should be measuring is the number of boats, the LDL particles. This is a much greater indicator of risk for heart disease.

So what can be affecting healthy LDL particles? Oxidative stress naturally occurs within the body for energy production. It’s a process that ages or “rusts” cells. Think of an apple turning brown after you cut it. Oxidative stress is expedited by a poor diet (excess sugar intake and refined carbohydrates), lack of exercise, and low resources known as anti-oxidants. If oxidative stress is increased then cells become severely damaged by free radicals as do the LDL molecules responsible for carrying fats to the brain. In addition, excess sugar binds with LDL increasing the risk for free radical formation by 350 times. As a result oxidized LDL becomes smaller and denser. The lining of the artery becomes fragile and oxidized LDL stimulates collagen which forms fibrous plaque and weakens the stability of the plagues/walls making it more likely to rupture. This creates heart attacks.

Nothing could be farther from the truth with the idea eating cholesterol and saturated fats raises cholesterol levels and that high cholesterol in the blood is what’s driving heart disease.  Fat is not the enemy; sugar is.

Next blog I’ll share what tests you should be taking and how you can discuss this with your doctor.

Be well,

Lynn

Hormones making you crazy? Blame it on the amygdala.

anxietygirlHormonal imbalances can be at their wildest during the perimenopausal years; that is the 10 years before the onset of menopause.  In that 10 years first your progesterone levels drop and then eventually your estrogen levels.  For many women, they may feel as though their caught in a horrific storm with no end in sight.  There is no pattern and every woman is an individual destined for a time of potential hot flashes, weight gain, emotional rides and bleeding hell.  Yes, these symptoms may be common but they are not normal.  If you are not sure if this pertains to you refer to my article “Have you entered perimenopause yet?”

Fluctuating hormones  are part of a feedback loop involving  a very special part of the brain referred to as the limbic system.  In the limbic system the hypothalmus , the pituitary and the amygdala are the majors in  charge of determining hormone levels throughout the body.  For those of you that have seen my Brain/Body Diagram, this is a reminder that the brain and body and the body and the brain are always communicating.  It’s a two way street.

The amygdala is the part of the brain that takes in stress and environmental input and manufactures your emotional and mental response.  Women especially between the ages 35 to 40 are greatly affected by the brain-hormone feedback loop.   Because the hormones are fluctuating there is a mismatch in the trigger and response by the amygdala. It works something like this: the hormones sputter, the brain gets the signal, stress is perceived in the outside world (a co-worker frustrates you) and the amygdala manufactures an emotional response (makes you cry).    Typically this would not be the emotion of your choice but it was the amygdala who did the interpretation.  So what to do? Blame it on the amygdala!

Many of you may be thinking…this just isn’t fair.  And I would entirely agree.  So what is the best way to address the amygdala and all other symptoms that are adding to the feelings of ‘crazy’?

1.  Reduce our stress response.  Meditation, yoga, deep breathing.

2. know that there’s a really good chance that your emotional response may be not logical.  Try counting to three before reacting.

3. Get your hormones in balance, beginning with the adrenals.

4.  Not sure which hormones are out of balance?  Take the Hormone Cure Quiz.  It’s fast and you can do it in the comfort of your home.

 

Be well,

Lynn

Have you hit perimenopause yet?

Peri what? Most women don’t know that perimenopause is the 10 years prior to the onset of menopause.  It can create the rockiest of moments and days.   In the first half of the decade the ovaries reduce their production of progesterone.  In the second half estrogen levels drop.  A woman’s  hormones fluctuate in this effort to eventually sputter out completely crossing the finish line at menopause.  In this hormonal fluctuation, wild emotions, low libido, weight gain around the hips, hot flashes and many other symptoms can introduce themselves letting the woman know that menopause will be arriving.  Many of you may be thinking…wow, 10 years is a long time.   How do you know if you are in the peri-menopausal phase?  And what can you do about it?

The assessment below was created by the great Dr. Sarah Gottfried.  If 5 or more of these questions seem totally related to you then yep you’re in perimenopause.

DO YOU HAVE, OR HAVE YOU EXPERIENCED, IN
THE PAST SIX MONTHS . . .
■ Feeling far less jolly about doing the grocery shopping,
laundry, dishes, and cooking than you did, say, ten years ago?
■ A preference for social isolation combined with wardrobe
malfunction (you’re newly introverted, reluctant to wear
anything other than your yoga pants if you have to leave the
house)?
■ A need to unbutton your jeans to make room for the roll
around your waist, which seemed to arrive overnight?
■ Emotional instability—for the first time in your life, you burst
into tears at work when in a crucial meeting and your kid calls
with an adolescent crisis?
■ A lack of satisfaction with exercise, since it doesn’t seem to
affect your weight?
■A general feeling of blah or reclusiveness; do you find yourself
watching the clock and wondering when it might be socially
acceptable to extricate yourself from normal activities and retire
for the evening?
■ A problem sleeping (indiscriminant debates and ruminations
awakening you in the middle of the night)?
■ A habit of waking up so sweaty that you need to change
your nightgown and sheets, and perhaps even your husband
(or partner)?
■ A face with crow’s feet and a permanently furrowed brow?
■ A lack of attention to personal grooming habits (you really
don’t care how attractive you look)?
■ An attitude toward your children that’s less gung-ho and more
ambivalent than it once was?
■ A menstrual period so unpredictable that you don’t know
whether you’re in for spotting or flooding or some weird
combination of the two?
■ Sudden forgetfulness when walking into a room (knowing
you had a purpose but searching for clues as to what it was)?
■ A continual doubting of your own instincts and insights?
■ More frequent announcements to the family that “Mom’s going
to take a nap now” or “Mom needs a time-out”?
■ A preference for chocolate or a glass of wine over sex (which,
frankly, may just be your lowest priority)?
■ A notion that Zoloft or a little Prozac sounds increasingly
appealing?
■ An opinion that addressing your mood issues by giving up
sugar, alcohol, and flour, taking various supplements, and
hormonal tweaking sounds like way too much work?
Taken from Dr. Sarah Gottfried_The Hormone Cure

If you found that at least 5 of these symptoms represent how you feel and behave then know that you are not alone.  You are officially in perimenopause and you have the black and white assessment to prove it (To Spouse: See babe, I’m not crazy).  Hopefully by now you are feeling validated in knowing that there is a name for this symptomatic time in your life.  So what can you do about it?

1.  Know that there physiological reasons for you feeling this way

2. Believe that you have the right to feel much better

3.  Have confidence in the Hormone Cure protocols.  Want to know more about the Hormone Cure protocols? Take the free online quiz here.

Stay tuned for more blog posts on the hormonal years….and how to blame the crazy times on the amygdala!

Stay tuned and be well,

Lynn

 

Exciting new developments at Advocate for Healing

I have just recently accomplished my training under Dr. Sarah Gottfried in her bestseller protocols: the Hormone Cure. Harvard-trained Dr. Sarah Gottfried developed these protocols after personally going through hormonal ‘hell’. After being recommended to eat less and exercise more and take an anti-depressant she was determined to research proven lifestyle choices and supplementation that would get to the root cause and make her feel better. That’s exactly what she did! She has used her proven protocols on over 10,000 of her patients and has found repeated success. She has a loooong waitlist for patients/clients to see her. BUT she wants this information to get out to over 1 million women in the next year. She extended her training to skilled practitioners and I was one of the fortunate practitioners to learn under her and be authorized to use her assessment and her protocols.

What does this mean? Using an assessment, referred to as the Hormone Cure Quiz, I can gather how your adrenals and your hormones are functioning. No saliva, blood, sweat or tears up front. It’s a simple FREE online assessment that you can now take through my website, here at AdvocateforHealing.com. Answer the questions and complete your contact information and I’ll be in touch.

How is this different than what I’ve typically offered? Prior to being trained in the Hormone Cure I used upfront functional labs to assess Hormone imbalances. Now I can offer this free online assessment and recommend protocols first. Then if further investigating is warranted I may recommend that the hormone assessment lab panel be completed. In other words, this new training builds onto my existing training in allowing two phases of assessment while always looking for the root cause(s) and providing the body the tools it needs to heal. I am so excited to offer this new insight!

Take the quiz here

Please don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions.

Be well,
Lynn

The Hormone Cure Quiz

Rule Your Hormones Quiz

Welcome to the Hormone Cure Quiz developed by Dr. Sarah Gottfried, a Harvard-trained gynecologist. Doctor Gottfried has used this quiz on over 10,000 clients with great success with results.  Dr. Sarah has trained additional practitioners to help her educate more than 1 million women on how to feel great again using a nutritional approach. As one of the privileged practitioners trained in the Hormone Cure I can extend this quiz to you. 

No longer are symptoms “normal”.  Now you can get answers to your fatigue, weight gain, hormonal issues, low libido, sleeplessness, hot flashes, etcetera.

I’ve used Dr. Sarah’s Hormone Cure Quiz verbatim per her requirements.  It is free to  take but will require a name and a valid email address.  Please include any additional contact information you may find helpful. 

Please complete the quiz to the best that you can. The results will be sent to me and I will contact you so we can get started in helping you feel well again.

I’m also trained as a functional diagnostic nutrition practitioner and will assist you with immune, digestive, detoxification, environmental stressors and neurotransmitters so be sure to add additional information that you think will be helpful.

You can reach me at the Contact Us page if you have any further questions.

signature