Archive for the ‘Digestive Issues’ Category

Learn how to not get sick this year! FREE WEBINAR

I’ve recorded my FREE WEBINAR “Learn how to not get the flu (or any other sickness) this year, whether you’ve had the flu shot or not!”.  

In my FREE Webinar you’ll learn what steps you can take.  This is all FREE information, loaded with invaluable tips that you can start practicing immediately!  

Please watch and share.  (You’ll want to start the webinar about 1 minute and 49 seconds into it when the webinar actually begins).  

This FREE Webinar only requires 30 minutes of your time and may prove to be invaluable!

I’d love to hear your feedback.

Be well,

Lynn

“Why diseases don’t exist and what really makes you sick”

The title is quoted from Dr. Hyman’s recent blog. Dr. Hyman is a functional medicine doctor and mainstream well-recognized guru in the field of functional medicine. I encourage you to read this particular blog from top to bottom if:

  • You are 1 in 2 (yikes!) Americans that experience a chronic illness 
  • You have been give a name (chronic fatigue syndrome) for your illness, then it’s blamed (it’s because you have chronic fatigue syndrome) for your illness and then it was attempted to be tamed (here’s a medication).  
  • You don’t have results and are stuck in sickness.

My apologies if this comes across too harsh but the information is necessary.

Please read the blog here 

Always in your interest to be well,

Lynn

Register for a FREE WEBINAR: Learn how to NOT get the flu this season (whether you’ve had the flu shot or not)

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Join me in a FREE Webinar and learn how to prevent getting sick with the flu or any other virus or infection running rampant.  

We know that the actual flu virus only affects 5% to 20% of the American population.  The remainder of spreading results from other viral strains.  When affected the average recovery may take up  to 20 days.  

What you’ll learn:

  • It’s not your coworkers or your children that give you the flu
  • The triggers that make you vulnerable to get the flu and other infections 
  • That you don’t have to give up all of your favorite foods to feel great
  • You have complete power over your health.

Be sure to register and please share with others.

The date for the webinar is Monday, January 18th at 5:00pm PST  I’ll keep it brief but chocked full of tools you can walk away with. 

Register by clicking this link.

Helping you find the tools to be well,

Be well,

Lynn

 

rc1Welcome to Advocate for Healing.  

My name is Lynn Altieri-Need and I have one mission:

to help families find the tools they need so they can heal

You may find me discussing through podcasts, webinars and blogging:   Kids Health 101, Nutrition for Seizures, Stress Hormones and digestion as my main focuses but you’ll see by my testimonials that my training as a functional diagnostic nutrition practitioner can help with nearly any symptom or illness that plagues an individual.   After all, I don’t treat the symptoms, I support the individual.  I don’t “guess”, I “test”. Come visit with me for a complimentary 30 minute consultation and be sure to sign up for updates on the right so you can be “in the know” of the most current knowledge available.



The best functional lab test for complex illnesses

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I hear so often from my clients that they’ve visited their doctor and that their lab tests are ‘normal’ or that they can’t find anything wrong even though my clients feel like crap (Diagnosis code ‘FLC’!).  In the functional world of nutrition we are looking less at symptoms and more at systems.  Hormones, the Immune system, digestion, detoxification, and neurotransmitters.  We are interested in stress hormones, sex hormones, the integrity of the digestive system, the backbone to energy (your mitochondria), the maximum ability to detoxify, nutritional deficiencies, the absorption of fatty acids, and if there are infections present.  It’s a multi-faceted approach targeted at one interest:  

Identifying the internal stressors and what supports need to be put in place.  

There is one test that can assess all of the above.  It’s referred to as the Organic Acids Test and it measures metabolism and assesses the body’s absorption of key nutrients.  It’s been invaluable in the field of biomedical intervention for application with:

Children with autism
Anxiety,
ADD,
Colitis
Digestive Issues
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Neurological Disorders
Seizure disorders
Movement disorders
Multiple Sclerosis
Alzheimers
Tic Disorders
OCD
Fibromyalgia
and so much more.

The great news is this test can be done in the comfort of your own home, via urine.  The kit can be shipped and the results come to me to evaluate and discuss.  You can read more about an organic acids test here.  Please note, an organic acids test ordered through an allopathic physician does not offer the same detail that a functional organic acid test offers. 

If you are experiencing any of the above disorders or want more information please don’t hesitate to contact me.  Stay tune for a webinar on this subject.

Be well,

Lynn
 

FREE WEBINAR: Rule your hormones- How to take back control.

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If you just can’t figure out why:

  • You don’t feel positive most of the time
  • When stress attacks you’d rather run than take it on
  • You forgot what sleep is
  • You crave chocolate and coffee
  • You don’t have time to complete all of the tasks on your to do list without feeling overwhelmed
  • You wake up wanting to stay in bed
  • You can’t recall where you put your keys and your children (most of the time)
  • When your spouse or kids bug you, you are ready to flee
  • Your weight is wildly fluctuating

Then please JOIN ME in a FREE WEBINAR on “Rule Your Hormones: How to take back control ” on December 3rd, 2015 3pm PST.  Register here

Be well,

Lynn

Hormones making your crazy? Join me in a FREE WEbinar

anxietygirlJoin me in a FREE WEBINAR “Rule Your Hormones: How to Take Back Control”.  Register here

Hormonal imbalances can be at their wildest during the perimenopausal years; that is the 10 years before the onset of menopause.  In that 10 years first your progesterone levels drop and then eventually your estrogen levels.  For many women, they may feel as though their caught in a horrific storm with no end in sight.  There is no pattern and every woman is an individual destined for a time of potential hot flashes, weight gain, emotional rides and bleeding hell.  Yes, these symptoms may be common but they are not normal.  If you are not sure if this pertains to you refer to my article “Have you entered perimenopause yet?”

Fluctuating hormones  are part of a feedback loop involving  a very special part of the brain referred to as the limbic system.  In the limbic system the hypothalmus , the pituitary and the amygdala are the majors in  charge of determining hormone levels throughout the body.  For those of you that have seen my Brain/Body Diagram, this is a reminder that the brain and body and the body and the brain arealways communicating.  It’s a two way street.

The amygdala is the part of the brain that takes in stress and environmental input and manufactures your emotional and mental response.  Women especially between the ages 35 to 40 are greatly affected by the brain-hormone feedback loop.   Because the hormones are fluctuating there is a mismatch in the trigger and response by the amygdala. It works something like this: the hormones sputter, the brain gets the signal, stress is perceived in the outside world (a co-worker frustrates you) and the amygdala manufactures an emotional response (makes you cry).    Typically this would not be the emotion of your choice but it was the amygdala who did the interpretation.  So what to do? Blame it on the amygdala!

Many of you may be thinking…this just isn’t fair.  And I would entirely agree.  So what is the best way to address the amygdala and all other symptoms that are adding to the feelings of ‘crazy’?

 

Join me in a FREE Webinar on “Rule Your Hormones: How To Take Back Control”

Be well,

Lynn

How to get through perimenopause? FREE WEBINAR

I deal with so many women that need help through the 10 years of hormonal havoc that results just from being a women.  I’m offering a FREE Webinar, Monday, November 30th.  Register here.  In case you are not certain what’s causing weight fluctuations, a feeling of being out of control, hot flashes, feeling depressed, losing your mind and/or are just plain “off”?  If so here’s a blog posted awhile back.  

Peri what? Most women don’t know that perimenopause is the 10 years prior to the onset of menopause.  It can create the rockiest of moments and days.   In the first half of the decade the ovaries reduce their production of progesterone.  In the second half estrogen levels drop.  A woman’s  hormones fluctuate in this effort to eventually sputter out completely crossing the finish line at menopause.  In this hormonal fluctuation, wild emotions, low libido, weight gain around the hips, hot flashes and many other symptoms can introduce themselves letting the woman know that menopause will be arriving.  Many of you may be thinking…wow, 10 years is a long time.   How do you know if you are in the peri-menopausal phase?  And what can you do about it?

The assessment below was created by the great Dr. Sarah Gottfried.  If 5 or more of these questions seem totally related to you then yep you’re in perimenopause.

DO YOU HAVE, OR HAVE YOU EXPERIENCED, IN
THE PAST SIX MONTHS . . .
■ Feeling far less jolly about doing the grocery shopping,
laundry, dishes, and cooking than you did, say, ten years ago?
■ A preference for social isolation combined with wardrobe
malfunction (you’re newly introverted, reluctant to wear
anything other than your yoga pants if you have to leave the
house)?
■ A need to unbutton your jeans to make room for the roll
around your waist, which seemed to arrive overnight?
■ Emotional instability—for the first time in your life, you burst
into tears at work when in a crucial meeting and your kid calls
with an adolescent crisis?
■ A lack of satisfaction with exercise, since it doesn’t seem to
affect your weight?
■A general feeling of blah or reclusiveness; do you find yourself
watching the clock and wondering when it might be socially
acceptable to extricate yourself from normal activities and retire
for the evening?
■ A problem sleeping (indiscriminant debates and ruminations
awakening you in the middle of the night)?
■ A habit of waking up so sweaty that you need to change
your nightgown and sheets, and perhaps even your husband
(or partner)?
■ A face with crow’s feet and a permanently furrowed brow?
■ A lack of attention to personal grooming habits (you really
don’t care how attractive you look)?
■ An attitude toward your children that’s less gung-ho and more
ambivalent than it once was?
■ A menstrual period so unpredictable that you don’t know
whether you’re in for spotting or flooding or some weird
combination of the two?
■ Sudden forgetfulness when walking into a room (knowing
you had a purpose but searching for clues as to what it was)?
■ A continual doubting of your own instincts and insights?
■ More frequent announcements to the family that “Mom’s going
to take a nap now” or “Mom needs a time-out”?
■ A preference for chocolate or a glass of wine over sex (which,
frankly, may just be your lowest priority)?
■ A notion that Zoloft or a little Prozac sounds increasingly
appealing?
■ An opinion that addressing your mood issues by giving up
sugar, alcohol, and flour, taking various supplements, and
hormonal tweaking sounds like way too much work?
Taken from Dr. Sarah Gottfried_The Hormone Cure

If you found that at least 5 of these symptoms represent how you feel and behave then know that you are not alone.  You are officially in perimenopause and you have the black and white assessment to prove it (To Spouse: See babe, I’m not crazy).  Hopefully by now you are feeling validated in knowing that there is a name for this symptomatic time in your life.  So what can you do about it?

 

Join me in a FREE WEBINAR on November 30th, 2015 at 3pm PST.   Register here.

Be well,

Lynn

Stress that’s fun?

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I just took my 13 year old daughter and her thrill seeking friend to Magic Mountain, Six Flags: the world of leaping, dashing, twisting, diving, dare-to-scream roller coasters.  The girls couldn’t wait to experience fear, thrills and adrenaline gushing responses from riding on a roller coaster that lasted anywhere from 30 seconds to 4 minutes.  I too had a little bit of “add it to my bucket list” eagerness.  So we left super early to drive 5 hours to get there just in time for Magic Mountain to open.  

When we arrived we anxiously reached our first ride to find out it was temporarily closed.  We rushed to the second ride available, the Ninja Rollercoaster, and enjoyed the twist, turns and jolts.  The girls reported that the ride was “decent”; it caught their breath, excited them and they experienced a temporary sense of relief when it was over.  We then anxiously moved to the second roller coaster, the Collosus;  the longest roller coaster in the world (4 minutes).  We all hopped on to experience neck thrashing, body jiving and intermittent moments of breath holding (okay, maybe that was just me).  For four complete minutes my blood was pumping, pupils were dilated while I felt entirely power-less in any potential outcome (death did cross my mind).  ALL of these symptoms: the rush, the high and a low, invoke a stress response in the body.  The same stress response that when overextended in a chronic state can precede chronic inflammation and illness (and often without us even knowing it). The same stress response that is my focus on getting back in balance for all of my clients.  And yet I was electing to experience this VOLUNTARILY.  

Don’t get me wrong.  I wouldn’t have changed one decision.  It was super fun.  But after cracking my neck on the Colossus I elected that any major roller coasters were amiss for me moving forward.   The girls, on the contrary, enjoyed pursuing even more aggressive rides.  

Typically when I explain the stress response I use the example of raking the yard when a bear appears and that the stress response doesn’t end until the bear leaves.  In a chronic state the body “sees the bear” all day long.    Following their 250 foot vertical drop at the Superman ride, my daughter she told me she was exhausted and summarized so eloquently: “I feel like I’ve seen 10 bears today”.  We took full advantage of a restful evening of recovery.  

I wasn’t sure whether to title this post “Stress that’s fun” or “Fun that’s stress”.  Regardless, I learned another new thing that day.  Keep track of your external stressors.  Often times we are introducing new ones without even knowing it.

For us thrill seekers I now can use the example of a rollercoaster ride and set the bear, bathtub and kettle metaphors on the side.  

Be well,

Lynn

The best supplements for Hashimoto’s

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Dr. Christensen nailed this article.  So I’m going to insert it exactly as is.  For those of you with the autoimmune condition of Hashimoto’s, here is an excellent summary of the supplements that are needed (and not much more).  (Note: Lifestyle choices are equally as important but are not included here).

“Supplements To Take For Hashimoto’s

 By: Dr. Alan Christianson

 

With the vast array of supplements readily available, it’s easy to get overwhelmed with taking too many each day. When it comes to which supplements to take for Hashimoto’s, I have a simple strategy: Keep it focused and simple.

What do I mean by that?

With Hashimoto’s, you want to make sure you are getting what you need, and you aren’t getting what you don’t need.

Simple, right?

Some supplements will work against your body and set you back. Others aren’t bad, per se, but they aren’t the most important when it comes to treating Hashimoto’s. Remember, your body metabolizes all supplements through the liver, so taking 20-30 a day may have little benefit and be hard on your system.

Which supplements do you want to make sure you are getting?

  1. Vitamin A: You want to get a good blend of carotenoids. Beta carotene is the carotenoid you hear about most. Your body makes beta carotene into active vitamin A. In order to get a good blend of carotenoids, look for whole foods and versions of vitamin A that contain them. I love palm fruit, as it has a nice spectrum of carotenoids and is very bioavailable. This means it’s easy for the body to convert and activate.
  1. Vitamin C: I recommend 500-1,000 milligrams per day and not much more than that. There is a lot of data proving antioxidants are important, but if you have too much of any one, you end up robbing your body’s own antioxidants (like superoxide dismutase or glutathione).
  1. Vitamin D: This vitamin is super-important and available in many forms. I prefer the capsules, as it’s easier to track how much I’m getting. Very few people reach a good blood level of Vitamin D with less than 10,000 units per day. Make sure you’re taking enough, and you’re taking it with food.

When considering vitamin D supplementation, it’s important to realize this vitamin allows your body to absorb calcium. This is a good thing if you’re getting the right type of calcium, and your body is using it properly, yielding stronger bones. It’s a bad thing if it isn’t the right type of calcium or if your body isn’t using it well. This will create plaque in the blood vessels, causing joint calcification, kidney stones or gallstones.
The important types of calcium are those similar to the calcium found in plants. They dissolve easily in water. My favorite form is dicalcium malate. It won’t cause calcification or gum up your arteries. This type is also free of lead. A lot of calcium is derived from oyster shells or bones (like the microcrystalline hydroxyapatite). There is concern about lead contamination with these types. (Because bone tissue always contain lead, there is also concern regarding bone broths, collagen and gelatin.)
It is good to take a plant-based magnesium, as well. When it comes to calcium-magnesium ratios, many of the high-dosage guidelines were based on types not easily absorbed. I’m a fan of a couple hundred milligrams (or even slightly less) per day and in close-to-equal ratios. When you’re taking forms that are well-absorbed and free of lead, you don’t need much.

  1. B-Vitamins: The B-vitamins are all critically important. Let’s look at them individually.

Folic Acid: Avoid all synthetic folic acid. This is important for one reason: Those with thyroid disease have a gene defect that causes folic acid to be poison, raising the risk for colorectal cancer. Instead, look for methylfolate as your folate source. You need a milligram per day, which is 1,000 micrograms. This helps your body with its methylation pathways.

B12: The preferred form of B12 is methyl B12, which is well-absorbed orally.

Biotin: Biotin is critical for your hair, skin and nail health. You want to take 3,000 micrograms (and not more than 3,500 micrograms) per day. If you take much more than this, it actually blocks the body’s usage of it. Many people take mega doses, thinking it will help their hair, and it doesn’t.

B6: Both pyridoxine hydrochloride and pyridoxal 5-phosphate are good forms of B6.

Thiamine: There is current data, showing thiamine is beneficial for both the antibodies of Hashimoto’s and hormone conversion.

B5 (Pantothenic Acid or Pantothenate): This B-vitamin benefits your cortisol levels and cortisol conversion. It’s good to have a few milligrams per day

  1. Vitamin K: The best form of vitamin K is vitamin K2. The most research has been done on a form called MK-7. It’s like the vitamin K we make in our intestinal tract. Vitamin K2 allows your body to direct calcium to the bones and away from the blood vessels. It also plays an important role in your blood’s ability to clot properly.
  1. Trace Minerals: Trace minerals and ultra trace minerals are extremely important. When it comes to thyroid disease, selenium is the big hitter. Selenium is difficult to absorb and is still being debated as to how well it enters the bloodstream in supplemental form. The most data is available regarding selenium glycinate complexes (selenium bound with a carrier protein, called glycine). This form is easily absorbed, non-toxic and effective.

Also, consider a few of the more exotic trace minerals: vanadium, molybdenum, boron and manganese. These are all critical for building and utilizing thyroid hormones.

  1. Bioflavonoids: There are two important bioflavonoids I recommend: hersperetin and quercetin. These do well in strengthening your connective tissues. Varicose veins, hemorrhoids or easy bruising are all related to the strength of connective tissue. So, take a few milligrams of these two bioflavonoids on a regular basis to help round out your supplementation.
  1. Essential Fats: EPA and DHA are the critical essential fats to control inflammation, keep the brain functioning well and help repair joints and cartilage.”

Be well,

Lynn